On Monday, May 21, 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court issued what is widely regarded as the most important decision for U.S. employers this year.  In a 5-4 decision, in Epic Systems Corporation v. Lewis (and two other related matters), Justice Neil Gorsuch, writing for the majority, held that workplace employment agreements that bar employees from

In a monumental decision last week, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB” or the “Board”) overruled 13 years of precedent and reframed the test for determining whether “facially neutral” employer handbooks, rules, and policies can be “reasonably construed” to violate the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”).  A link to the NLRB’s decision can be found

On Friday, April 21, 2017, the Second Circuit affirmed a National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) ruling, which found that Pier Sixty, LLC (“Pier Sixty”) violated the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) when it terminated its employee, Hernan Perez (“Perez”), for comments posted on Facebook.

In 2011, after a supervisor had given directions to Perez and

On August 27, 2015, in the case of Browning-Ferris Industries of California, Inc., et al. v. Sanitary Truck Drivers and Helpers Local 350, et al., the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) adopted a new “indirect control” standard for determining joint employer status under the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”). By a narrow 3-2 decision,

As promised, on August 25, 2011, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) issued final regulations pursuant to which the NLRB now requires all National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) – covered employers to post a notice to employees informing them of their rights under the NLRA.  NLRA-covered employers include private employers that have an impact on