New Jersey Law Against Discrimination

In Quinlan v. Curtiss-Wright Corporation, __ N.J. __ (December 2, 2010), the New Jersey Supreme Court considered whether an employee’s taking, copying and dissemination of an employer’s confidential documents can be a protected activity under the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination, N.J.S.A. 10:5-1 et seq. (“LAD”). After balancing LAD’s strong public policy of

According to the New Jersey Supreme Court in Nini v. Mercer County Community College (decided June 1, 2010), New Jersey employers can refuse to hire or promote individuals who are over 70 years of age on the basis of age, but will violate the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (“LAD”), N.J.S.A. 10:5-1 et seq.,

On January 15, 2010, Governor Christie signed into law a bill clarifying the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (“NJLAD”), N.J.S.A. 10:5-1, et seq., as it applies to persons with a developmental disability. This law amends the definition of “disability” in the NJLAD to expressly include “autism spectrum disorders.” N.J.S.A. 10:5-5(q).

In light of the amendment,

The Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) was recently expanded with the enactment of the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (the “Amendments Act”), which brings the ADA more in line with the already broad New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (“NJLAD”). The Amendments Act modifies the ADA in many significant areas. First, the Amendments Act significantly expands the previous