On Thursday, August 29, 2013, New Jersey’s Governor Christopher Christie signed bill A-2878 into law.  This law places New Jersey in line with the growing trend of states restricting employers’ ability to require job candidates to provide information (i.e., usernames and passwords) about their personal social media accounts, such as Facebook or LinkedIn.

The final

On May 18, 2011, the National Labor Relations Board (the “NLRB”) announced its issuance of a complaint against Hispanics United of Buffalo (“HUB”) arising out of HUB’s termination of five employees who posted comments on Facebook criticizing HUB’s working conditions.  As we previously posted with regard to the In re American Medical Response of Connecticut

On December 7, 2010, we blogged about In re American Medical Response of Connecticut, Inc., a case in which the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) filed a complaint against ambulance company American Medical Response (“AMR”) alleging that AMR’s termination of an employee who posted negative remarks about her boss on her Facebook page

In the most recent chapter on social media and the law, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) recently filed a complaint against American Medical Response of Connecticut, Inc. (“AMR” or the “Company”), claiming that the Company violated federal labor law when it disciplined and then terminated an employee who posted disparaging remarks about her supervisor