On Friday, April 21, 2017, the Second Circuit affirmed a National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) ruling, which found that Pier Sixty, LLC (“Pier Sixty”) violated the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) when it terminated its employee, Hernan Perez (“Perez”), for comments posted on Facebook.

In 2011, after a supervisor had given directions to Perez and

The New York City Council approved legislation on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, which bans NYC employers from relying on past salary history when making hiring decisions. The legislation, known as Introduction 1253-A, is intended to prevent the single interview question: “How much did you make at your previous job?”

Proponents of the legislation suggest that

On Thursday, August 29, 2013, New Jersey’s Governor Christopher Christie signed bill A-2878 into law.  This law places New Jersey in line with the growing trend of states restricting employers’ ability to require job candidates to provide information (i.e., usernames and passwords) about their personal social media accounts, such as Facebook or LinkedIn.

The final

In City of Ontario v. Quon, decided on June 17, 2010, the United States Supreme Court held, for the first time, that the City of Ontario’s review of a police officer’s text messages was reasonable and, therefore, did not violate the Fourth Amendment. In Quon, Jeff Quon repeatedly exceeded the character limit on