Americans with Disabilities Act

Since the Americans with Disabilities Act–often referred to as the ADA—was passed by Congress in 1990, lawsuits under the Act have been quite common.  These lawsuits, until recently, have focused on physical or architectural barriers to places of public accommodation such as restaurants, retail stores and strip malls.  The emphasis has been on items

The United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) issued final rules yesterday establishing how employer-sponsored wellness programs can comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (“GINA”), without discriminating against employees or running afoul of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (“HIPAA”).

In today’s health-driven world, many employers

For the first time in 30 years, on July 14, 2014, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) has issued comprehensive guidelines for employers dealing with pregnant employees in the workplace (the “Guidance”).  Employers must remember that while EEOC guidance is not law, the Agency’s position on such topics will be relied upon by the courts.  

There have been recent changes to the statutes of limitation applicable to many employment claims.  Steven Adler, Chair of the Employment Law Department of Cole Schotz and Kathryn Dugan, an associate in the Department, recently had an article on the subject published in the April 13, 2009 issue of the New Jersey Law Journal.  Click