Americans with Disabilities Act

With the United States Supreme Court’s decision not to hear the appeal in the matter of Robles v. Domino’s Pizza, the landscape with respect to website accessibility lawsuits under the Americans with Disabilities Act remains both somewhat murky and probably daunting to those who defend such claims.  This decision will, in all likelihood, have both

In an update with respect to perhaps one of the most important and far-reaching appellate decisions on website accessibility cases filed by legally blind or visually impaired plaintiffs pursuant to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Domino’s Pizza, less than two months ago, filed a petition for writ of certiorari with the United States Supreme

In another blow to those defending website accessibility cases, brought by legally blind or visually impaired plaintiffs under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit recently reversed the dismissal of a lawsuit filed pursuant to Title III of the ADA in the United States District Court

Florida has long been considered a hotbed of lawsuits filed under Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act.   Certainly, that practice has continued with the most recent trend of ADA cases, namely lawsuits alleging that websites are not accessible to the legally blind or visually impaired.

For those defending website accessibility cases under the